Extending Tiger Paws

Is it a good idea to give students more time in the day for tiger paws?

Sports+Medicine%3A%0ARoleplaying+a+concussed+player%2C+senior+Madi+Mohar%2C+allows+her+fellow+students+to+examine+her+symptoms.+Students+in+the+sports+medicine+strand+of+CAPS+learn+about+preventing%2C+managing+and+rehabilitating+injuries+in+athletes+and+active+citizens.+Sports+medicine+students+practice+skills+in+the+lab+and+work+with+healthcare+professionals+and+BV%E2%80%99s+athletic+trainers.
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Extending Tiger Paws

Sports Medicine:
Roleplaying a concussed player, senior Madi Mohar, allows her fellow students to examine her symptoms. Students in the sports medicine strand of CAPS learn about preventing, managing and rehabilitating injuries in athletes and active citizens. Sports medicine students practice skills in the lab and work with healthcare professionals and BV’s athletic trainers.

Sports Medicine: Roleplaying a concussed player, senior Madi Mohar, allows her fellow students to examine her symptoms. Students in the sports medicine strand of CAPS learn about preventing, managing and rehabilitating injuries in athletes and active citizens. Sports medicine students practice skills in the lab and work with healthcare professionals and BV’s athletic trainers.

Melanie White

Sports Medicine: Roleplaying a concussed player, senior Madi Mohar, allows her fellow students to examine her symptoms. Students in the sports medicine strand of CAPS learn about preventing, managing and rehabilitating injuries in athletes and active citizens. Sports medicine students practice skills in the lab and work with healthcare professionals and BV’s athletic trainers.

Melanie White

Melanie White

Sports Medicine: Roleplaying a concussed player, senior Madi Mohar, allows her fellow students to examine her symptoms. Students in the sports medicine strand of CAPS learn about preventing, managing and rehabilitating injuries in athletes and active citizens. Sports medicine students practice skills in the lab and work with healthcare professionals and BV’s athletic trainers.

Liya Patel, Staff Writer

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I think it is safe to say that everyone’s favorite part of the school day is the one-hour break that is given to us for homework, lunch, tutoring, etc.

But is one hour enough to get all of that done? I don’t think so.

Many students use the time that is given to talk to teachers and make sure that they are getting all their work done so they can stay on top of their grades, and one hour is not enough to do all that in.

To add to that, all teachers are only available for half of Tiger Paws — so if a student needs assistance, then they would have to wait until their teacher is available.

I believe we should extend the amount of time that we have in the middle of the day, to make sure that all students have the opportunity to get their work done and to talk to their teachers if needed.

This would help a student stay on top of their grades, and make sure that they have every opportunity to get the help that they need.

Tiger Paws is a great way to help students take a brain break or do their work, but we need more than an hour to do so. ExtendingTiger Paws would help not only our grades but the well-being of our students.

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