Playing our Parts for the Arts

Funding for Low for Certain Parts of Blue Valley

Jaron Lucas, Fall 2016 J1 Student

School is often a stressful environment. It’s filled with tests, homework, projects and not enough of what students actually enjoy, and what could truly benefit their lives.

Don’t get me wrong, learning is important. Tests and homework is important. Understanding fundamentals for grammar is important.

But so is the arts. So is music, and acting and clubs.

Those things all fall into the category of what is called Art Education, or the arts.screen-shot-2016-11-28-at-10-08-09-am

Following the recession in 2008, funding for the arts was greatly cut. Whenever something is looked to be cut funding-wise, the arts is the first candidate.

I don’t understand why it’s put to the side, why it’s not important. Because to us students, it is important to excel and stay sane.

In fact, art education improves performance in individuals.

Students that express themselves can do this because of the arts. Schools that have arts programs with a high priority are considered on the lower end of the spectrum, and schools that have “core” subjects are on the higher end of the spectrum, so they’re more “respected.”

The arts engage both sides of the brain, both left and right. Classes like creative writing mix core subjects into a class that has aspects of the arts as well. And they’re still
looked to be cut, and  are rare compared to how often they used to be around.

If the school is the body, the arts are the spine.

They hold it up and supply movement to the tendons and ligaments, being the classes.

More funding is important to go to the arts because a lot of students in Blue Valley are involved in at least one class or program from them. We need to play our part, even if it’s something very simple, like starting a fundraiser.